Time of day
Not every beautiful scene always looks really beautiful. Moreover, as a rule, we must make a lot of effort, show patience and observation to show the subject in its best…

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Incandescent lamps (Tungsten or Incandescent)
Very cold balance, designed to neutralize the orange light of incandescent lamps with a color temperature of about 3000 K. Images taken in the evening under artificial light, in the…

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Good pictures in bad light
Regularly photographing in natural light, it is not difficult to notice that a really good light (not abundant, but good) is a frustratingly rare phenomenon. Let's be honest: beautiful lighting…

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place

Color balance

The colors of objects that we see are not a property of the objects themselves, but a property of our vision. Grass looks green only because light rays reflected from it with a wavelength in the range of 500-565 nm, falling on the light-sensitive receptors of the eye, cause the brain to feel green. Having got used to the fact that the grass is usually green, we see it green even in unusual lighting. Human vision is characterized by color impermanence. Our brain adjusts the color balance so that objects retain their natural colors for us as much as possible, regardless of the color of the lighting. White paper seems to us equally white, that in the daytime, when it is illuminated by cold light pouring from the window, that in the evening, when the warm light of incandescent lamps falls on it. Continue reading

Sharpness
Is sharpness important for a good photo? Yes and no. On the one hand, a technically perfect photo should usually be definitely sharp. No matter how interesting it may be…

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The strategy for choosing the optimum diaphragm
Find the aperture value at which your lens shows the best sharpness, and use this value whenever possible (most often it is f/8 or so). If you don't have enough…

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How to get it in practice
What could be simpler? Take a picture; Take a look at the histogram; If the exposure is in order-it's in the hat; If the histogram indicates underexposure or overexposure, use…

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