Central and peripheral vision
Often, a scene that looks attractive to our eyes is completely unrepresentable in the photo – with a whitish, illuminated sky, with black holes in the place of shadows, with…

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Don't forget the polarizer
If you are forced to photograph landscapes or architecture in the middle of the day, a polarizing filter can help you. The polarizer makes the sky darker, eliminates sun glare…

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Color balance
The colors of objects that we see are not a property of the objects themselves, but a property of our vision. Grass looks green only because light rays reflected from…

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Don’t forget the polarizer

If you are forced to photograph landscapes or architecture in the middle of the day, a polarizing filter can help you. The polarizer makes the sky darker, eliminates sun glare and displays colors. In short, almost any daytime scene shot through a polarizer looks more colorful and lively than it actually is. Sometimes the use of a polarizer is the only effective way to give a midday scene at least some freshness and originality.

Khust castle on a Sunny day
A few words about HDR
HDR, i.e. combining several images taken with different exposures, theoretically allows you to cope with any, however contrasting lighting, but in practice this method is not always applicable. The fact is that HDR implies absolute static not only of the camera, but also of the scene. This almost completely excludes portrait photography and photo-hunting from consideration, and for shooting landscapes containing vegetation or other objects that fluctuate in the wind, it requires a complete calm. Meanwhile, the absence of wind in the middle of the day is extremely rare (usually the wind subsides in the evening), and since we are talking about the midday hours, then shooting HDR at this time can be seriously difficult. In addition, HDR is (from my point of view) the heavy artillery of a landscape photographer, used for really beautiful, but complex lighting scenes, and to mess with HDR for the sake of Protocol shots of ordinary daytime landscapes, frankly, I’m just too lazy.

Conclusion
It is obvious that no amount of subterfuge can help turn melancholy lighting into imaginative lighting, and the photographer should never forget this. After all, light is the most important element of any photo, and any compromises in lighting inevitably affect the quality of the image. But it is also true that having a certain wit, you can get quite acceptable shots even in the most seemingly inappropriate circumstances for photographing.

Close up
A cloudy day is a good time for macro photography. This is an area where high contrast is rarely appropriate, while diffuse lighting makes the shooting process comfortable and controlled.…

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Light
Light is the heart of photography. The camera does not see the image. There are no lines, shapes, or textures for it. A film or digital sensor is only susceptible…

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Exposition. The exposure compensation
Exposure is the amount of light needed to create a photo. Nothing complicated. The exposure is dosed with fixed assets: Extract Aperture ISO sensitivity value Flash (or other lighting devices)…

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