The strategy for choosing the optimum diaphragm
Find the aperture value at which your lens shows the best sharpness, and use this value whenever possible (most often it is f/8 or so). If you don't have enough…

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Tonal range values
The tone of a photographic image is determined by the proportions in which black, white, and gray tones are correlated. Degrees of tonality in photography The human eye recognizes up…

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Time of day
Not every beautiful scene always looks really beautiful. Moreover, as a rule, we must make a lot of effort, show patience and observation to show the subject in its best…

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Don’t forget the polarizer

If you are forced to photograph landscapes or architecture in the middle of the day, a polarizing filter can help you. The polarizer makes the sky darker, eliminates sun glare and displays colors. In short, almost any daytime scene shot through a polarizer looks more colorful and lively than it actually is. Sometimes the use of a polarizer is the only effective way to give a midday scene at least some freshness and originality.

Khust castle on a Sunny day
A few words about HDR
HDR, i.e. combining several images taken with different exposures, theoretically allows you to cope with any, however contrasting lighting, but in practice this method is not always applicable. The fact is that HDR implies absolute static not only of the camera, but also of the scene. This almost completely excludes portrait photography and photo-hunting from consideration, and for shooting landscapes containing vegetation or other objects that fluctuate in the wind, it requires a complete calm. Meanwhile, the absence of wind in the middle of the day is extremely rare (usually the wind subsides in the evening), and since we are talking about the midday hours, then shooting HDR at this time can be seriously difficult. In addition, HDR is (from my point of view) the heavy artillery of a landscape photographer, used for really beautiful, but complex lighting scenes, and to mess with HDR for the sake of Protocol shots of ordinary daytime landscapes, frankly, I’m just too lazy.

Conclusion
It is obvious that no amount of subterfuge can help turn melancholy lighting into imaginative lighting, and the photographer should never forget this. After all, light is the most important element of any photo, and any compromises in lighting inevitably affect the quality of the image. But it is also true that having a certain wit, you can get quite acceptable shots even in the most seemingly inappropriate circumstances for photographing.

Good pictures in bad light
Regularly photographing in natural light, it is not difficult to notice that a really good light (not abundant, but good) is a frustratingly rare phenomenon. Let's be honest: beautiful lighting…

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Hunting for color
Pink cloud Nature is self-sufficient in its beauty, and its beauty shines whether anyone looks at it or not. Most people never see really beautiful flowers in their daily lives…

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Exposition. The exposure compensation
Exposure is the amount of light needed to create a photo. Nothing complicated. The exposure is dosed with fixed assets: Extract Aperture ISO sensitivity value Flash (or other lighting devices)…

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