Sharpness
Is sharpness important for a good photo? Yes and no. On the one hand, a technically perfect photo should usually be definitely sharp. No matter how interesting it may be…

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Time of day
Not every beautiful scene always looks really beautiful. Moreover, as a rule, we must make a lot of effort, show patience and observation to show the subject in its best…

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Factors affecting bokeh
The number and shape of aperture blades The arrangement of the lens aperture affects not so much the quality of the blur as the shape of the blur circles. In…

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aperture

Basic settings of the camera

I recommend that any novice photographer actively use the camera’s automation whenever possible. This applies to matrix metering, autofocus, automatic white balance, and everything else that can only be automated, and with which modern cameras often cope better than modern photographers. Load the camera with all the menial work, and pay more attention to finding beautiful scenes and harmonious frame layout.

But there are times when a camera that thinks it’s too smart has to be taken in hand.

Sunset
Shot on full automatic. What the hell? Continue reading

Camera modes

Today, any digital camera offers the photographer a frightening variety of shooting modes. Due to the fact that the instructions for cameras describe the features and purpose of a particular mode is very vague, it can be difficult for a novice Amateur photographer to determine which modes are really useful, and which are marketing nonsense. As a result, many people either spit on everything and shoot exclusively in AUTO mode, without trying to dig deeper, or, believing the authors of the instructions, try to use narrow-minded story modes (Portrait, Landscape, Sports, Macro, etc.), not suspecting that with a minimum of mental effort, you can achieve much more flexible and complete control over the camera without any damage to your own comfort. Continue reading

Exposure compensation

Modern cameras are equipped with a built-in exposure meter, which is able to automatically assess the level of illumination and select the appropriate values of the exposure parameters. If the exposure value offered by the exposure meter does not suit the photographer, he can either switch to manual mode and set the exposure independently, or, while remaining in automatic mode, use exposure correction. Exposure correction or exposure compensation is a forced change in exposure relative to the value determined by the exposure meter. Positive exposure compensation causes the camera to increase the exposure by a specified amount, and negative exposure causes it to decrease. For example, if the camera’s exposure meter allows one step overexposure under certain conditions, you should apply an exposure correction of – 1 EV to get a normally exposed frame. Continue reading

Exposure compensation
Modern cameras are equipped with a built-in exposure meter, which is able to automatically assess the level of illumination and select the appropriate values of the exposure parameters. If the…

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Color balance
The colors of objects that we see are not a property of the objects themselves, but a property of our vision. Grass looks green only because light rays reflected from…

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Exposure compensation
Modern cameras are equipped with a built-in exposure meter, which is able to automatically assess the level of illumination and select the appropriate values of the exposure parameters. If the…

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